Raw, Local Honey

localhoney5-26-14

What’s so special about raw, local honey? Raw honey is an entirely different substance than what you find in those cute little bear bottles at the typical grocery store. According to a study done by Food Safety News, among many others, the product labeled as honey in 75-100% of cases has been heated and ultra-filtered to remove all traces of pollen, which the FDA says means it doesn’t qualify as honey anymore. The reason behind processing honey this way is that pollen is necessary to test the product’s origins. Honey from China and other countries with different regulations than our own often contains heavy metals, antibiotics, and other potentially harmful substances, but it’s so easy and inexpensive to get honey from such places that most companies find it too good an offer to pass up. To make even more of a mess, companies may also dilute this processed product called honey with corn syrup to lower the price so more customers will buy it.
In it’s natural, raw form, honey is an alkaline-forming food with beneficial vitamins, enzymes, and antioxidants that is anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal. Honey has been widely used to soothe cuts, strengthen the immune system, and treat allergies, since local honey contains a small amount of the same pollens that cause allergic symptoms.
Besides all that, honey is simply delicious. At All is Well, we currently carry pint jars of local, raw honey from C. J.’s Farm in Opp, AL, both Wildflower and Clover varieties, for $9.00. Stop by and grab a jar to go with the yummy, fresh fruits that are ripening now, like our 6 oz. blackberries for $3.25. We look forward to seeing you soon.
For more info:
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/tests-show-most-store-honey-isnt-honey/#.U4O9IM4o7cs
http://www.naturalnews.com/035493_raw_honey_health_benefits_antibacterial.html##ixzz32rViT9Ca

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This entry was published on May 26, 2014 at 11:10 pm. It’s filed under Healthy eating and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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